TrendingErmal Hajrizi

Paper Fashion

TrendingErmal Hajrizi
Paper Fashion

by Walter Thulin

In the early 1900s, the highest-end masquerade costumes were made of paper. These outfits were often single-use and they were prized for their intricacy. In the 1960s, paper clothing came into fashion again, this time being mass produced extremely cheaply.

Today, select designers use paper to flesh-out their personal style.

Mercedes Arocena and Lucía Benitez:

Source: Behance

Source: Behance

Source: Behance

Source: Behance

The Nintai dress line was Uruguayan artists Mercedes Arocena and Lucía Benitez first (and as of yet, only) foray into the world of paper design. These origami-styled dresses use intricate folds to create depth and unique patterns. 

Bea Szenfeld:

Source: Bea Szenfeld

Source: Bea Szenfeld

Source: Bea Szenfeld

Source: Bea Szenfeld

Bea Szenfeld has worked with Tommy Hilfinger, Bjork, and Lady Gaga, creating unique works for each of them. Bea is known for her experimental pieces, which rely on uncommon fabrics (or, in this case paper).

Jum Nakao:

Source: Mylo

Source: Mylo

Brazilian fashion designer Jum Nakao has designed an exclusive line for Nike, created outfits for the closing ceremonies of the London Olympics, and had models walk down Parisian runways. Nakao made his name working with paper constructions and his intricate designs show his comfort with the unique medium.